Presentations

FAS Technology Renewal, at Science Center, Hall B, Thursday, June 25, 2015

For IT at Harvard, FY16 can be summarized by one word: Delivery. 

HUIT will deploy many new technologies this year, from Canvas to my.harvard to HarvardKey.

From the simplest things like registering for courses and grading student assignments to the most fundamental ways we communicate with one another by phone and email—we are making improvements. And it is all happening this year. Collectively we are calling these programs FAS Technology Renewal. 

Read more about FAS Technology Renewal

Parallelization of Large-Scale Image Processing Workflows to Unravel Neuronal Networks, at Harvard IT Summit, Thursday, June 4, 2015

The function of neurons and neuronal networks depend on their connectivity. Mapping these connections would accelerate understanding of how cellular and network function is generated; however, detailed connectivity maps are difficult to obtain. We use high-throughput electron microscopy to tackle this problem. Here, we demonstrate our approach to automating a large-scale image processing and alignment pipeline. We will present a software tool that parallelizes a serial workflow implemented on a high-performance computing cluster.

Speakers: Read more about Parallelization of Large-Scale Image Processing Workflows to Unravel Neuronal Networks

Digital Preservation 101, or, How to Keep Bits for Centuries, at Harvard IT Summit, Thursday, June 4, 2015

Digital archivists need to preserve electronic records permanently. This presentation will cover the prevailing model for long-term digital preservation along with the requirements of a trustworthy digital repository. The presentation will also cover preferred file formats for long-term storage; a small detour through digital forensics and FRED machines; and why archivists cry themselves to sleep at night when the general public conflates “archives” with “backup copies” of data.

Speaker: Julie Swierczek, Digital Asset… Read more about Digital Preservation 101, or, How to Keep Bits for Centuries

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